Issue 15: Dogmas of War (//)

October 6, 2002 marked the first anniversary of the day when the U.S., responding to an attack by 19 hijackers on their soil, began bombing Afghanistan. October 2002 is also touted as the month when the US will begin a second assault on Iraq, ostensibly for the crime of possessing weapons of "mass destruction."

Along with this cycle of attacking a variety of real and imagined enemies across the world, the US government has also embarked upon a policy of the severe truncation of democratic rights and civil liberties of their citizens and the honest working-folk in the country who are termed "illegal immigrants." As members of the South Asian diaspora, we have watched with increasing frustration as people of South Asian and Arab descent in particular find themselves threatened, incarcerated without trial, deported, and generally bullied by the swiftly changing institutional framework of the USA.

What does it mean to intervene effectively in a situation where even the most basic of human rights are under threat? SAMAR responds to this issue in our current forum, titled "Dogmas of War." Through poetry and analyses, we concentrate on the responses of common citizens and activists to various wars all over the world. Be it the U.S., Sri Lanka or Palestine, the forces of militarism continue to operate with impunity, and we need newer words with which to describe their force, as well as the inchoate and incipient modes of activism that characterize the victims of this new force. Our contributors to the forum try to frame a new politics and aesthetics of intervening in the nervous condition of the immigrant, where "it has been decreed that none will walk with their heads held high."

October 6, 2002 marked the first anniversary of the day when the U.S., responding to an attack by 19 hijackers on their soil, began bombing Afghanistan. October 2002 is also touted as the month when the US will begin a second assault on Iraq, ostensibly for the crime of possessing weapons of "mass destruction."

Along with this cycle of attacking a variety of real and imagined enemies across the world, the US government has also embarked upon a policy of the severe truncation of democratic rights and civil liberties of their citizens and the honest working-folk in the country who are termed "illegal immigrants." As members of the South Asian diaspora, we have watched with increasing frustration as people of South Asian and Arab descent in particular find themselves threatened, incarcerated without trial, deported, and generally bullied by the swiftly changing institutional framework of the USA.

What does it mean to intervene effectively in a situation where even the most basic of human rights are under threat? SAMAR responds to this issue in our current forum, titled "Dogmas of War." Through poetry and analyses, we concentrate on the responses of common citizens and activists to various wars all over the world. Be it the U.S., Sri Lanka or Palestine, the forces of militarism continue to operate with impunity, and we need newer words with which to describe their force, as well as the inchoate and incipient modes of activism that characterize the victims of this new force. Our contributors to the forum try to frame a new politics and aesthetics of intervening in the nervous condition of the immigrant, where "it has been decreed that none will walk with their heads held high."

Articles in this Issue

An Interview with Henri Tiphagne

Immigration and Labor After 9/11

Manu Vimalassery

Monday, October 08, 2001
after arriving home from my weekend upstate, i fell asleep with a sadness that comes when i leave behind the comforts of the sounds of the river and the hikes through the forest. feeling slightly ill, i awoke and checked my email and saw the headline i had been dreading

the one that took me back ten years

we had spent the afternoon celebrating my friend's birthday, we came home and we rang the doorbell and her mother opened the door with tears in eyes, she was crying and she was saying, and i can't remember now, if she said:

Saba Waheed

The Position of Muslims in the UK and the US

Junaid Rana

An Anti-Detention Testimonial

The Story of Indian Ocean

Badal Malick

Reflections from a Journey Through Palestine

Ravi K. Dixit

Non-violence in an Era of Nuclear Nationalism

Ashwini Tambe
Christi Merrill

The Pleasures and Politics of Hindi Film Culture

Amit S. Rai

Two Documentaries About the Recent Carnage in Gujarat

Rupali Ghosh
Rahul De

A review of Sunaina Maira's Desis in the House

Raza Mir

teaser

D'Lo