Issue 40: Circles of Gender Justice (5/31/2013)

Gendered violence plays a pervasive and significant role in the lives of modern women around the globe. In that vein, we present a special issue on women’s responses and activism against gender-based violence in South Asian and South Asian diasporic communities.

Discussions of gendered violence are often framed around a specific violent act, yet the sexism, homophobia and patriarchy that informs this violence shapes not only daily life, but also the broader societies which are built upon them. This issue of SAMAR looks at how women are responding to the shape of violence in their communities -- the places where they live, work and play -- and how they are pulling apart the small and large aspects of social, legal and political institutions to stop gender-based oppression.

Articles in this Issue

In 2010, the Bangladesh Government, led by Sheikh Hasina, set up the International Crimes Tribunal and charged as many as 12 individuals for participating and assisting in war crimes and crimes against humanity during Bangladesh’s war of independence from Pakistan. The tribunals not only address the worst rape concentration camps in history; they also reveal the inner struggles of a society as it faces demands for gender justice, along with secularism and social justice.  Unnoticed by most of the world, there is a revolution happening here.

Zakia Afrin

Nahar Alam and Chitra Aiyar discuss the varied, subtle, and often unknown narratives that arise both in the not-for-profit economy and the lives of the members of Andolan-a among the members of Andolan – Organizing South Asian Workers, a Queens-based workers’ center that seeks to empower low-wage immigrant workers (primarily female domestic workers) through popular education, collective organizing, and litigation. 

Chitra Aiyar, Nahar Alam

Seema Sohi reviews Vivek Bald's new book, Bengali Harlem and the Lost Hostories of South Asian America. She notes, "Bengali Harlem is more than an excavation of histories that have yet to receive their full due. By tracing the South Asian American presence in neighborhoods like Treme in New Orleans, Harlem in New York, and Black Bottom in Detroit, Bald focuses on the forging of multiracial communities in early South Asian America."

Seema Sohi

Hamzah Saif reviews Saadia Toor's The State of Islam, "a forceful corrective to the dialogue on Pakistan."

Hamzah Saif

Dear Readers,

Gendered violence plays a pervasive and significant role in the lives of modern women around the globe. In that vein, we present a special issue on women’s responses and activism against gender-based violence in South Asian and South Asian diasporic communities.

A long history of agit prop inspires SAWCC's recent "FreedomSafetyNow" protest against gender-based violence.

Swati Khurana